26Jun2022

SCM Medical Missions

Contacts

3806 Whitman Ave N
Seattle WA 98103

info@scmmedicalmissions

+1 206-545-7307

Category: Education

All the blog posts about education and stuff
EducationRefugees

Tukwila Center Expenses Update

The Tukwila Community Center has been up and running for almost three months now, with programs to teach Arabic grammar to the refugee children and English to the adults, life skills for getting around their new community, swimming, arts and crafts, CPR and first aid, and more.

Here are the expenses to run the center. Your donations are going towards the following:

July 2017
$1376.84 for space rent, food, teachers, supplies, cleaning and set-up

August 2017
$1800.07 for space rent, food, teachers, CPR course, swimming lessons, supplies, set-up and cleaning

September 2017 (through 9-15-2017)
$1049.38 for space rent, food, teachers, supplies, set-up and cleaning

Thank you for your continued support!

EducationGreeceHumanitarian AidRefugees

What Life is Really Like in a Refugee Camp

Recent Greece volunteers, Rana and Iman Shanawani, were interviewed by a New York Public Radio program called The Takeaway.  Click on the photo and headline below for a link to the interview and photos from the online story.

rana-interview

pri

EducationGreeceHumanitarian AidRefugees

Volunteers Needed in Greece

SCM is continuing our work in Greece to at least the end of this year. We are really focusing on teaching and doing activities with the refugees. Activities can include arts and crafts, teaching a new skill, taekwondo, and just interacting with the residents of the camp. Many are fighting depression and are starved for something to do that is meaningful and mentally stimulating. We are in particular need of Arabic speakers, and self-starters.

mha-robin

Maha and Robin from Seattle in the warehouse at Karamanlis. They are doing soccer skills and Maha is translating. These are the supplies they brought with them.

If you have some skills that you would like to share, please contact our office for more information about volunteering. Also, below is a link to a story on KCTS 9, the local public television station that talks about what SCM is doing and what it’s like to volunteer.

http://video.kcts9.org/video/2365868407/ 

 

EducationHumanitarian AidJordanUncategorizedWomen & Children

#SCM Jordan Update – Sept 17, 2016

I have had a chance to visit our Jordan operations the last few days and see how things are going here. I was able to help out in the warehouse and also with a distribution to a community center in the Kerak region. It was a center that helps women in poverty to give them training and skills to help lift them out of poverty. They also have a microfinance program to help women get started in a new venture to make money for their families. Thank you to Myssar Majali and Raouf Hjazeen for arranging this visit and distribution for SCM to The Ladies of Al Kasar Village and introducing us to your important work.

It was really interesting to learn about their organization and their programs, and good to be able to give the children in need there new backpacks for school. The backpacks were donated to SCM by Operation Refugee Child (www.operationrefugeechild.org). We also gave them knitted items and hygiene kits for the parents.

20160917_013203 20160917_014108

20160917_015353

20160917_023745

EducationGreeceHuman RightsHumanitarian AidRefugeesSyriaWomen & Children

It’s easy to feel deeply from 6,000 miles away

A post written by Rita a few days ago~

I was talking to my daughter this morning in the Carolinas as they were weathering tropical storm Hermine and as always we got onto the subject of Syria. We talked about the continued humanitarian aid that SCM is involved with in Greece and Jordan and she said, “As much as we take care of the fallout, the cause of the violence continues. It feels like a bottomless pit of suffering.”

It’s easy to feel deeply from 6,000 miles away. It’s harder to do something about it. Governments and people globally should beware: If we don’t do something to address the situation in Syria and save the children from their current fate, then we won’t just undermine the future of these children, but we’ll be hurting our own as well.

What’s to become of the Syrian children? The lucky ones will move to Europe or the United States, where they’ll eventually learn the local language and attend schools and universities. They’ll dream of returning home, as most refugees do, but in the interim, they will become an integral part of our societies, contributing to our economies and cultural diversity.

Unfortunately, this future is for the select few. The vast majority will remain displaced and will miss years of education — if they ever return to school. According to the United Nations, 4 million Syrian children are currently not in school. If we don’t address this harsh reality, these children could face one (or more) of three likely outcomes: they could become professional beggars; they could be abused and trafficked as child labor or sexual slaves; or they could be recruited by terrorist organizations.

Please support any NGOs and churches taking care of children and educating them while war ravages their lands. Meanwhile, we can get involved in the public discourse on refugees and argue for their fair treatment and human rights.

Laila, my daughter, talks about her friend still in Aleppo and how she is working to just barely support her entire extended family of 22 people; but how long can she do that? How long will her job there be viable in the midst of such an insane war? We talk about how to get her out, which might not even be possible at this point, but then if we could get her out, would she be able to get a job – could she get a job to support herself and to send money back to the family that is still there? How do the Syrians make these kind of decisions, how do they leave their families behind, knowing they might never see them again?

Where is there a light at the end of this tunnel? We need to do more. More work with our governments to stop this war and the fighting. We especially need to invest in creating opportunities for the children. We, the people of the world, need to open our eyes and not only when we see a picture of a little “Omran” that makes us cry. We need to continue to ask, ‘How can this keep happening?’ and not just go back to our lives after a week goes by, until the next picture gets noticed. We need to pressure our governments to do something to Stop This War. We need to give the Syrian people a light at the end of their tunnel, so they can see where they will be going and what they will be doing and that they will be able to go back to their homeland, not just interminably stay in flex, living in temporary camps in Greece, Jordan, Lebanon, Turkey.

Most importantly, international governments and the people who elect their governments need to understand that if we remain complacent, the effects of the conflict on Syrian children will haunt us for years to come.

~Rita


Please consider donating to help SCM in our work in Greece and Jordan and our education programs to help keep the Syrian children from being left behind in this world. Education will help keep them safer from the dangers of terrorist group recruitment, allow them to go back to Syria someday when the war has ended and be a part of the rebuilding, and keep their futures full of possibilities and opportunities that would be lost if they are not able to continue with their education. Thank you for your continued support!

EducationGreeceHumanitarian AidWomen & Children

Education Centers Report

Our program coordinator for our Women and Children’s Programs in Greece, Rasha, submitted this report of her activities to date in setting up the new schools in two of the camps in Northern Greece.


Subject: SCM Educational Component in Northern Greece Refugee Camps (06/2016-08/2016)
Reported by: Rasha A.

Frakapor: Registration for this learning center site began about one week after my arrival to Greece. I conducted a tent-to-tent survey of school aged children (ages 5-18 yrs). Children with special needs were also reported. The learning center opened the following week. The site was not ideal for holding classes, but it was the only option as Save the Children refused to hand over or even share their site for SCM volunteers to hold classes. Therefore SCM volunteers worked with what they could to make the open site conducive to a proper learning space. Money raised by volunteers and donated by SCM itself was used to finance the needs of the center, including the purchase of notebooks and pencil packets (pencils, eraser, sharpener) for each child that attended, as well as small/large whiteboards, floor mats, etc.

Classes were arranged by the following age groups:
5-7 yrs
8-10 yrs
11-13 yrs
14+ yrs

Classes for 5-10 yr olds ran one hour (two – 30 minute subject sessions) daily.
Classes for 11+ yrs ran for 1.5 hrs (two – 45 minute subject sessions) daily.
Subjects included: Math, Arabic, English, Gym

English class for adults

English class for adults

Iliadis: Registration for this learning center site began about one month after my arrival to Greece. The reason for the delay was for one primary reason- the location for the learning center needed an infrastructure to be built. Therefore we were delayed in the start-up of that site. After about three weeks of planning and discussion with the builders, an initial infrastructure was put up. After another two weeks the main center structure was built. In addition to volunteers from various groups working to build SCM the site, they also custom made large cabinets and chalk boards as well as eventually returning with custom made school desks and chairs for the children.

Registration for school aged children (ages 5-18 yrs) was done prior to any building. Children with special needs were also reported.

Money raised by volunteers and donated by SCM itself was used to finance the needs of the center, including the purchase of notebooks and pencil packets (pencils, eraser, sharpener) for each child that attended, as well as small/large whiteboards, floor mats, workbooks, puzzles, etc.

Classes were arranged by the following age groups:
5-7 yrs
8-10 yrs
11-13 yrs
14+ yrs

Wooden desks and chairs ready to go to the schools we have set up

Wooden desks and chairs ready to go to the schools we have set up

Classes for 5-10 yr olds ran one hour (two – 30 minute subject sessions) daily.
Classes for 11+ yrs ran for 1.5 hrs (two – 45 minute subject sessions) daily.
Subjects included: Math, Arabic, English, Gym, Art

The site for this camp proved to be much more efficient for teaching, especially once I asked for a door to be built to control who comes in and out and also lower walls to be added to avoid distraction of the children during classes.

Note: Both sites included adult English classes (Beginner/Advanced) as well as alternative German for kids and adults.